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Coins Issued In Circulation By The European Union Countries

Information on this page has been sourced from www.eurocoins.liesemeijer.com

Country
New Common Side 2007/8

2007:
Belgium
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Ireland
Luxembourg
Monaco
the Netherlands
Slovenia
Spain

2008:
Austria
Italy
San Marino
Portugal
Vatican City

Above is valid for Euro Circulation Coins

There are exceptions for 2 Euro Commemorative Coins 2007

 

2009:
Monaco

No change
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As agreed by the informal Economic and Finance Ministers' Council of Verona in April 1996, the euro coins have a common side and a national side. For the selection of the design of the first common sides, a competition was organised at European level, and on 16 June 1997 the Amsterdam European Council decided and made public the winning series. Photographs of the common sides, together with a brief factual description of the designs, were published in the Official Journal (1). On 7 June 2005 the Council decided that the common sides of the 10-, 20- and 50-cent coins and the 1- and 2-euro coins, which currently represent the European Union before it was enlarged from 15 to 25 Member States in 2004, should be modified so that all Member States of the European Union will in the future be represented. The common sides of the smallest denomination coins (1-, 2- and 5-cent) represent Europe in the world and are not affected by the enlargement of the European Union. The new common sides will be applied as from 2008. The Member States adopting the euro from 2008 onwards will only issue euro coins with the new common sides. The Republic of Slovenia will be the first of the new Member States to do so. Current euro-area Member States may also start to apply the new common sides as from 2008 for new coin production, and will in any event switch to the new common side by 2008 at the latest.
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On the 10-cent, 20-cent and 50-cent coins, the numeral, representing the value of the coin, appears on the right-hand side of the common face. Horizontally, below the numeral, appear the words ‘EURO CENT’, the latter placed below the former. The word ‘CENT’ is written in bigger letters with a major capital ‘C’. Six straight lines run vertically between the lower and upper left hand side of the face. 12 stars are superimposed on these lines, one just before the two ends of each line. Superimposed on the mid- and uppersection of these lines, the European continent is represented. The initials ‘LL’ of the engraver appear between the numeral and the edge on the right-hand side of the coin.
On the 1-euro and the 2-euro coins, the numeral, representing the value of the coin, appears on the lefthand side of the common face. Six straight lines run vertically between the lower and upper right-hand side of the face. 12 stars are superimposed on these lines, one just before the two ends of each line. The European continent is represented on the right-hand side of the face. The right-hand part of the representation is superimposed on the mid-section of the lines. The word ‘EURO’ is superimposed horizontally across the middle of the right-hand side of the face. Under the ‘O’ of EURO, the initials ‘LL’ of the engraver appear near the right-hand edge of the coin.
Official Journal of the European Union
Austria
Ringed by the stars of the EU the smallest coin shows a gentian flower from the Alps. Below is the date and the red-white-red flag of Austria.
The famous edelweiss flower adorns this coin together with the 12 stars, the flag and the date.
The alpine primrose fills the centre of this bronze coin, surrounded by the stars, flag and date.
St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna has been taken as an example of gothic architecture in Austria. The unusual view highlights the magnificent gothic tower. The European stars, the Austrian flag and the date are standard elements on all the coins
The baroque style is demonstrated by the Belvedere Palace. In the foreground is the magnificent wrought iron gate, while in the distance one sees the baroque palace of Prince Eugene of Savoy.
Art Nouveau or "Jugendstil" is documented by the Vienna Secession. This exhibition hall caused almost as much controversy at its opening in 1897 as the artists themselves who founded it. The dome of golden leaves has become a Viennese landmark.
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, one of Austria’s most famous sons, smiles at us from the 1 Euro coin. He was selected as an Austrian of European, of indeed worldwide, importance. The portrait used as model was that by Barbara Krafft in 1819.
Bertha von Suttner was chosen for the design of the 2 Euro coin. The baroness was a leading figure in the peace movement before the First World War, and in 1905 she received the Nobel Prize for Peace.
Belgium

King Albert II and a monogram – a capital "A" underneath a crown – among 12 stars, symbolising Europe. The year of issue is part of the design, along with the year the coin was struck. The Belgian Euro Circulation Coins were designed by Jan Alfons Keustermans, Director of the Municipal Academy of Fine Arts of Turnhout.
Belgium (From 2008)
In order to conform to the common guidelines on the design of national faces of coins (2), Belgium has updated the design of the Belgian national face of euro coins to be produced from 2008. Coins from previous years featuring the old Belgian national face will remain valid. The coin's inner section shows an effigy of His Majesty Albert II, King of the Belgians, in profile facing to the left. To the right of this, the royal monogram is displayed and, below it, the indication of the country ‘BE’. Underneath the effigy, the signature mark of the Master of the Mint is displayed on the left and the mint mark on the right, either side of the year. The outer ring of the coin depicts the twelve stars of the European flag.
Official Journal of the European Union
Belgium 2009
In order to conform to the common guidelines on the design of national faces of coins (2), Belgium has again updated the design of the Belgian national face of euro coins to be produced from 2009. The update of the effigy of His Majesty Albert II of Belgium that took place in 2008 was not allowed, because the effigy of a reigning head of state can not be adapted within a period of 15 years. The rest of the coin has not been changed. (Since no official pictures were found on the web, these are scans from a BU set).
Official Journal of the European Union
Cyprus
The 1, 2 and 5-cent coins show the moufflon, a species of wild sheep found on Cyprus and representative of the island’s wildlife.
Featured on the 10, 20 and 50-cent coins is the Kyrenia ship, a trading vessel which dates back to the fourth century BC and a symbol of Cyprus’s seafaring history and its importance as a centre of trade.
The €1 and €2 coins depict a cruciform idol from the Chalcolithic period (3000 BC). This characteristic example of the island’s prehistoric art reflects Cyprus’s place at the heart of civilisation and antiquity.
Official Journal of the European Union
Czech Republic
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Czech Republic has not yet issued any Euro coins
Czech Republic has not yet issued any Euro coins
Czech Republic has not yet issued any Euro coins
Czech Republic has not yet issued any Euro coins
Czech Republic has not yet issued any Euro coins
Czech Republic has not yet issued any Euro coins
Czech Republic has not yet issued any Euro coins
Czech Republic has not yet issued any Euro coins
Denmark
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Denmark has opted out of the Euro
Denmark has opted out of the Euro
Denmark has opted out of the Euro
Denmark has opted out of the Euro
Denmark has opted out of the Euro
Denmark has opted out of the Euro
Denmark has opted out of the Euro
Denmark has opted out of the Euro
Estonia
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Finland
These show a heraldic lion, which is a reproduction of a design by sculptor Heikki Häiväoja, surrounded by the 12 EU stars.
Two flying swans above a Finnish lake landscape, surrounded by the 12 EU stars. Designed by sculptor Pertti Mäkinen.
Two cloudberries and two cloudberry leaves, surrounded by the 12 EU stars. The image is designed on the basis of a 1988 competition entry by the late sculptor Raimo Heino.
France
This shows a young, feminine Marianne with determined features that embody the desire for a sound and lasting Europe. It was designed by Fabienne Courtiade, an engraver from the Paris Mint.
The theme of the sower is a constant in the history of the French franc. Designed by Laurent Jorlo, "this modern, timeless graphic represents France, which stays true to itself, whilst integrating into Europe".
A tree, drawn by the artist Joaquim Jiminez, appears on these coins, symbolising life, continuity and growth. It is contained in a hexagon and is surrounded by the motto of the Republic "Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité".
Germany
The oak twig, reminiscent of that found on the current German pfennig coins provides the motif for these coins. It was designed by Professor Rolf Lederbogen.
The Brandenburg Gate, a symbol of the division of Germany and its subsequent unification, is the motif used on these coins. The perspective of the design, by Reinhard Heinsdorff, emphasises the opening of the gate, stressing the unification of Germany and Europe.
The traditional symbol of German sovereignty, the eagle, surrounded by the stars of Europe, appears on these coins. This motif was designed by Heinz and Sneschana Russewa-Hoyer.
Greece
Depicting an advanced model of an Athenian trireme, dating from the times of Kimon (Maritime Museum).
Depicting a Corvette, i.e. a type of ship used during the Greek War of Independence (1821).
Depicting a modern tanker ship.
Depicting Rigas Velestinlis-Fereos (1757-1798). A forerunner and leading figure of Greek Enlightenment, Rigas Velestinlis-Fereos was also a visionary and a herald of the Balkans liberation from Ottoman rule. A fervent defender of the movement for Greece's independence and a martyr of the then-enslaved nation.
Depicting Ioannis Capodistrias (1776-1831). A leading national and European politician and diplomat, first Governor (1830-1831) of Greece after the War of Independence. After taking charge of the final stage of the revolution and playing a decisive role in the ultimate victory, Ioannis Capodistrias made notable contributions in such fields as domestic policy, education, justice, public works, social welfare, agriculture, stock breeding, trade and shipping.
Depicting Eleftherios Venizelos (1864-1936). One of Greece's most important political figures. Seven times Prime Minister, Eleftherios Venizelos was a pioneer in social reform and a versatile diplomat. He played a prominent role in the victorious military campaigns of 1912-1920.
Depicting an Owl (design taken from an ancient Athenian 4-drachma coin)

Click to Enlarge

430 B.C. Click to Enlarge
Depicting a scene from mythology, i.e. Europa being abducted by Zeus in the shape of a bull (from a mosaic in Sparta).
Hungary
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Hungary has not yet issued any Euro coins
Hungary has not yet issued any Euro coins
Hungary has not yet issued any Euro coins
Hungary has not yet issued any Euro coins
Hungary has not yet issued any Euro coins
Hungary has not yet issued any Euro coins
Hungary has not yet issued any Euro coins
Hungary has not yet issued any Euro coins
Ireland
The Celtic harp, a traditional symbol of Ireland, decorated with the year of issue and the word "Eire" - the Irish word for Ireland. The harp shown was designed by Jarlath Hayes.
Italy
The Castel del Monte.
The Mole Antonelliana, a tower designed in 1863 by Alessandro Antonelli.
The Flavius amphitheatre, which Emperor Vespasian began building around 75 AD and Emperor Titus inaugurated in 80 AD
Shows one of the most famous works in the world, the "Birth of Venus" by Sandro Botticelli.
A sculpture by Umberto Boccioni, leader of the Italian futurist school.
The statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback.
The famous drawing by Leonardo da Vinci, displayed in the gallery of the Academy in Venice, illustrating the ideal proportions of the human body.
Portrait drawn by Raphaël of Dante Alighieri, housed in the Pope Julius II Wing of the Vatican Palace.
Latvia
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Lithuania
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Luxembourg
His Royal Highness the Grand Duke Henri. They will bear the year of issue and the word "Luxembourg" written in Luxembourgish ("Letzebuerg"). Yvette Gastauer-Claire designed the coins by agreement with the Royal Household and the Luxembourg Government.
Malta
The 1, 2 and 5-cent coins depict the altar at the prehistoric temple complex of Mnajdra, built around 3600 BC on a low elevation overlooking the sea.
The 10, 20 and 50-cent coins bear the Emblem of Malta, a shield displaying a heraldic representation of the Maltese national flag and supporting a mural crown that represents the fortifications of Malta and denotes a city state. The shield is bounded on the left by an olive branch and on the right by a palm branch, symbols of peace traditionally associated with Malta, forming a wreath tied at its base by a ribbon which carries the inscription “Repubblika ta’ Malta” (Republic of Malta).
The €1 and €2 coins show the emblem used by the Sovereign Order of Malta. During the Order’s rule over Malta, between 1530 and 1798, the eight-pointed cross became associated with the island and is now often referred to as the Maltese Cross.
Official Journal of the European Union
Monaco
Monaco 2006
 
  Prince Albert's monogram is depicted on the inner part of the coin. ‘MONACO’ is engraved in a semi-circle above the coat of arms and ‘2006’ appears in a semi-circle below it, with the mint mark of the Paris mint to the left and the mint mark of the Engraver General to the right. The twelve stars of the European flag are depicted around the edge. On the inner part of the coin there is an effigy of Prince Albert in profile facing to the right. ‘MONACO’ is engraved in a semi-circle above the coat of arms and ‘2006’ appears in a semi-circle below it, with the mint mark of the Paris mint to the left and the mint mark of the Engraver General to the right. The twelve stars of the European flag are depicted around the edge.
Monaco 2009
After the death of Prince Rainier III of Monaco he was succeeded by his son Prince Albert II of Monaco. Consequently a new national side was designed. This was issued in 2006, but evidently with an "old" common side. In 2007 a 1 euro coin was issued with a "new" common side and in 2009 all coins were issued with a "new" common side. In 2009 8.000 BU sets of 8 coins were issued. Additionally 250.000 of the 2 euro coin were issued in circulation quality.
The Netherlands
Queen Beatrix is shown in profile and the words "Beatrix Queen of The Netherlands" are written around the circumference of the coins. Design by Bruno Ninaber van Eyben.
Queen Beatrix is shown in profile with the words "Beatrix Queen of The Netherlands" in Dutch. The 12 stars are confined to half the circumference of the coin. Design by Bruno Ninaber van Eyben.
Poland
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Poland has not yet issued any Euro coins
Poland has not yet issued any Euro coins
Poland has not yet issued any Euro coins
Poland has not yet issued any Euro coins
Poland has not yet issued any Euro coins
Poland has not yet issued any Euro coins
Poland has not yet issued any Euro coins
Poland has not yet issued any Euro coins
Portugal
Show the first royal seal, from 1134, along with the word "Portugal". Designer Vítor Manuel Fernandes dos Santos.
These depict the royal seal of 1142 as the centrepiece of the design. Designer Vítor Manuel Fernandes dos Santos.
Here the country’s castles and coats of arms are set amid the European stars. This symbolises dialogue, the exchange of values and the dynamics of the building of Europe. The centrepiece is the royal seal of 1144. Designer Vítor Manuel Fernandes dos Santos.
San Marino
Slovakia
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Slovenia
The stork is taken as a relief of the stork motif from the existing SIT 20 (author Janez Boljka).
This princely stone is the ancient symbol of the hierarchical organization of power in the Slovenian consciousness. We propose presenting a relief of its actual condition today.
The "sower of seeds" is a frequent motif used by many creative artists, primarily in the area of painting. With his vehement gesture he scatters his seeds, which when they float above the earth in elliptically curving paths give the impression of planetary bodies in their orbits. This is the moment that the sower of seeds draws closest to the creator.
Plecnik's unrealised plans for the Slovenian Parliament demonstrate the architect's vision of the nation's future independence.
The Lipizzaner is neither a racehorse nor a horse for war. He narcissistically shows his beauty at parades. He demonstrates his youthful and happy character with playfulness. For the coin we therefore propose two horses in a most beautiful pose: at play.
Slovenians have looked to Triglav in all of our fateful historical moments. Above the three-peaked mountain remains the vastness of unbounded space, containing among many others the constellation Cancer, which is the sign of the Zodiac under which Slovenia achieved its independence. The representation of Triglav is envisioned as a relief.
Writing was Trubar's tool: the recognizable, old, hand-made, slightly rough but nonetheless beautiful letters that shape the first printed Slovenian text. His typography forms the basis for spelling out the sentence STATI IN OBSTATI (Stand and Exist). His portrait is well known. The portrait is to be presented in relief on the coin.
Prešern's image remains largely unknown, despite the great number of "well-known portraits". For that reason we have decided to put his handwriting on the coin, as a sure confirmation that it is authentic Prešern. We used the poet's silhouette in relief (after Dremelj's portrait) because it attests to the "poetic character" of these little-known representation in a contemporary manner.
Spain
The cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, a jewel of Spanish Roman art and one of the most famous pilgrimage destinations in the world is pictured on these coins. They show the monumental façade of the Obradoiro, a splendid example of Spanish baroque construction, started in 1667 by Jose del Toro and Domingo de Andrade. It was finished in the 18th century by Fernando Casas y Novoa.
Miguel de Cervantes, the father of Spanish literature, is shown on these coins, reflecting "the universality of the man and his work".
Portrait of King Carlos I de Borbon y Borbon.
Sweeden
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Sweden has opted out of the Euro
Sweden has opted out of the Euro
Sweden has opted out of the Euro
Sweden has opted out of the Euro
Sweden has opted out of the Euro
Sweden has opted out of the Euro
Sweden has opted out of the Euro
Sweden has opted out of the Euro
UK
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UK has opted out of the Euro
UK has opted out of the Euro
UK has opted out of the Euro
UK has opted out of the Euro
UK has opted out of the Euro
UK has opted out of the Euro
UK has opted out of the Euro
UK has opted out of the Euro
Vatican 2002-2004
Vatican 2005
Vatican City has taken the initiative to issue at 30 June 2005 all Euro Circulation Coins for the Sede Vacante event.
On 2 April 2005, Holy Father John Paul II passed away; on 19 April 2005, Pope Benedict XVI was elected. During the vacancy of the See, ordinary administration was assumed by the Apostolic Camera, presided over by the Cardinal Camerlingo of the Holy Roman Church and composed of the Vice-Camerlingo and the Cleric Prelates of the Camera. The issuing of coins during the Vacant See is intended to commemorate the event and to ensure continuity by exercising the State's authority to mint coins. The series includes 8 different values (2 Euro, 1 Euro, 50, 20, 10, 5, 2 and 1 Eurocent). The reverse side bears the standard technical characteristics, which are the same for all the countries that have adopted the European single currency. The obverse side of all the coins bears the heraldic arms of the Cardinal Camerlingo and of the Apostolic Camera (two keys in saltire surmounted by a canopy), and the words "CITTA' DEL VATICANO", "SEDE VACANTE MMV" together with twelve stars.
Sculptor: Daniela Longo
Engraver: Maria Angela Cassol
Engraver: Luciana De Simoni
Engraver: Ettore Lorenzo Frapiccini
Engraver: Maria Carmela Colaneri
Engraver: Maria Angela Cassol
Engraver: Luciana De Simoni
Engraver: Ettore Lorenzo Frapiccini
Engraver: Maria Carmela Colaneri
Vatican 2006
The coin portrays the bust of His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI. Either side of the portrait are, to the left, the designer's initials ‘DL’ and, to the right, the mint mark ‘R’. The legend ‘CITTÀ DEL VATICANO’ followed by the year 2006 is engraved in a semi-circle above the portrait. The twelve stars of the European flag encircle the design.
The internal part of the coin portrays the bust of His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI. The year 2006 surmounted by the mint mark ‘R’ appears to the right of the coin. The legend ‘CITTÀ DEL VATICANO’ is arranged in the form of an arc of a circle broken by the portrait. The twelve stars of the European flag are positioned around the outer circle of the coin.
Sculptor: Daniela Longo
Engraver: Luciana De Simoni
Engraver: Luciana De Simoni
Engraver: Ettore Lorenzo Frapiccini
Engraver: Maria Carmela Colaneri
Engraver: Maria Angela Cassol
Engraver: Maria Angela Cassol
Engraver: Ettore Lorenzo Frapiccini
Engraver: Maria Carmela Colaneri